Autumn is my favourite season. The humidity of the summer is mostly gone, the nights are cool, and the days are still warm enough to keep the heavy jacket in the back of the closet.

With the exception of raking the lawn - and raking again, and again - there's nothing not to like about this time of year. Despite the work that goes along with keeping the yard in order, seeing the colours that Mother Nature unveils every fall is well worth it. 

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Lennox & Addington is a long and narrow county that stretches from Lake Ontario north past Denbigh, which allows us to view the colour transformation a little longer than in some places. In Addington Highlands, the leaves started changing a few weeks ago and are nearing peak viewing conditions. In the southern portion of the county, the colours are just beginning to pop.

In L&A there are over 450 kilometres of county roadways and hundreds of additional kilometres of township roads to explore. If you’re looking to take a drive to view the fall colours, Lennox & Addington is as good a place to see them as anywhere in the province.

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A few years ago the L&A Economic Development Office developed route itineraries that allow drivers to explore all corners of the county. Each of the six looping tours are themed, offering a focus on shoreline views, rural landscapes, agriculture, history and the Canadian Shield. Each of the loops make for an enjoyable tour of the countryside. 

The itineraries detail turn-by-turn directions, local tourist destinations, as well as links to local restaurants and eateries along the route. The service stations are also listed, just in case you need a fill-up along the way.

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At this time of year, my favourite loop is definitely “The Transition Drive”. The 101 kilometre tour takes you along County Road 15 through Croydon, up County Road 4 to Tamworth, along County Road 15 (Arden Road), Highway 7 to Kaladar, then back down County Road 41 through Erinsville. 

The southern portion of this route features working farms, wetlands and limestone outcroppings. As you travel north the surroundings change dramatically. Spectacular views of granite and evergreens begin to dominate as you enter the southern edge of the Canadian Shield. Hence the name ‘transition’. 

If you would like to request a copy of the itineraries to print at home, please contact us and we will email you the printable PDF.

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